Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Pennsylvania New CWD CASES PROMPT RESPONSE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:April 22, 2014


Release #031-14


NEW CWD CASES PROMPT RESPONSE
Game Commission expands Disease Management Area 2, considers action in Jefferson County.

          Chronic wasting disease was not detected in any of the samples collected from deer harvested by hunters during the 2013-14 Pennsylvania hunting seasons, the Pennsylvania Game Commission announced today.
         
However, two deer killed on highways in Bedford County late last fall tested positive for the disease.
         
Additionally, the disease has turned up at another captive deer facility in Pennsylvania, and was detected in a free-ranging deer just south of the Pennsylvania border.
         
All of these newly confirmed cases mean the Game Commission’s use of Disease Management Areas with special regulations to manage the disease will occur over a larger area in 2014-15.
          
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is not known to afflict humans, but is always fatal to the deer and elk it infects.

 
DMA 2 expands
          The two CWD-positive deer from Bedford County were killed within what is known as Disease Management Area 2 (DMA 2), where special rules already have been implemented to slow the spread of the disease. The CWD-positive deer from Maryland died at a site just 6 miles south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and directly south of DMA 2.
          Because of these new positives, DMA 2 has expanded significantly. The new boundary extends east to state routes 829 and 915, and Interstate 70.
          DMA 2 now extends south to the Maryland border. South of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, the western boundary of DMA 2 is state Route 96.
          The expansion of DMA 2 follows procedures set forth in Pennsylvania’s CWD Response Plan.
          A map of the newly expanded DMA 2 is available on the CWD Information page at the Game Commission’s website, www.pgc.state.pa.us. A detailed description of the exact boundary, which includes roads other than those listed, will be provided in the 2014-15 Pennsylvania Hunting & Trapping Digest issued to hunters at the time they purchase their licenses.
          Hunters harvesting deer within a DMA are not permitted to remove from the DMA any deer parts with a high risk of transmitting the disease. There are a few exceptions to this rule, including taking a deer to an approved deer processor or taxidermist outside the DMA, or traveling to an approved laboratory for disease testing.
          The use of urine-based deer attractants also is prohibited within a DMA, as is the direct or indirect feeding of deer. A complete list of rules applying to DMAs can be found in an executive order of the Game Commission, which also is available at the agency’s website.
          The head, not including detached antlers that are absent visible brain matter, is among a list of high-risk parts, which also is outlined in detail in the executive order.
          DMA 2 was established in 2013 after three deer harvested by hunters in Blair and Bedford counties tested positive for CWD. Now that it has been expanded, DMA 2 includes parts of Bedford, Blair, Huntingdon, Cambria and Fulton counties, and encompasses more than 1,600 square miles.
          The 600-square-mile DMA 1 was established in 2011 in York and Adams counties after CWD was detected at a captive deer facility there.
          Meanwhile, the Game Commission continues to develop its response to the CWD-positive deer case in Jefferson County. The plan figures to include the establishment of Pennsylvania’s third Disease Management Area.
          An announcement will be made when the response plan is completed.
          The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has placed under quarantine the Jefferson County deer farm where the CWD-positive deer died, and the Northampton County deer farm where it was born.
          The Game Commission and state Department of Agriculture will continue disease surveillance across Pennsylvania, following guidelines set forth in the agencies’ cooperative response plan.
 
CWD sampling from 2013
          All sampling associated with the 2013-14 deer seasons has been completed.
          During 2013, the Game Commission collected and tested samples from 5,120 deer statewide. In DMA 1, 738 samples – 271 of them from hunter-harvested deer – were collected and tested. In DMA 2, 1,060 samples – 618 of them from hunter-harvested deer – were collected and tested.
          Elsewhere in the state, 3,322 samples – 3,209 from hunter-harvested deer – were collected and tested.
          Of those samples, only the two Bedford County roadkills tested positive for the disease.
          Since 1998, the Game Commission has gathered and submitted more than 48,000 samples from wild deer and elk for CWD testing. A total of five free-ranging deer have tested positive.
 
CWD Information
          While chronic wasting disease is new to Pennsylvania, it is not a new disease. CWD was discovered in 1967, and it has been researched in great detail since then. Scientists believe CWD is caused by an unknown agent capable of transforming normal brain proteins into an abnormal form.
          CWD affects members of the cervid, or deer family. It is spread from animal to animal by direct and indirect contact.
          There currently is no practical way to test live animals for CWD, nor is there a vaccine. Clinical signs include poor posture, lowered head and ears, uncoordinated movement, rough-hair coat, weight loss, increased thirst, excessive drooling, and, ultimately death. Any animals suspected of having CWD should be reported to the Game Commission.
          There currently is no scientific evidence that CWD has or can spread to humans, either through contact with infected animals or by eating the meat of infected animals. As a precaution, however, people are advised not to consume meat from animals infected with CWD.
          Much more information on CWD, as well as a video instructing hunters on how they can process venison for transport and consumption, is available at the Game Commission’s website.
 
 
 
Saturday, April 19, 2014
 
*** Exploring the zoonotic potential of animal prion diseases: In vivo and in vitro approaches ***
 
snip...
 
*** These results would seem to suggest that CWD does indeed have zoonotic potential, at least as judged by the compatibility of CWD prions and their human PrPC target. Furthermore, extrapolation from this simple in vitro assay suggests that if zoonotic CWD occurred, it would most likely effect those of the PRNP codon 129-MM genotype and that the PrPres type would be similar to that found in the most common subtype of sCJD (MM1).
 
snip...
 
 
Tuesday, April 08, 2014
 
Pennsylvania Chronic wasting disease found in another deer in state
 
 
Thursday, January 02, 2014
 
Tests Confirm CWD Case in Pennsylvania Release #001-14
 
 
PENNSYLVANIA Hunt smart: CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD TSE PRION UPDATE
 
Hunt smart: CWD confirmed in one region of state
 
 
Friday, March 01, 2013
 
Pennsylvania CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE FOUND IN BLAIR AND BEDFORD COUNTIES GAME COMMISSION TO HOLD CWD NEWS CONFERENCE MONDAY, MARCH 4
 
 
Sunday, January 06, 2013
 
USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE
 
*** "it‘s no longer its business.”
 
 
Saturday, June 29, 2013
 
PENNSYLVANIA CAPTIVE CWD INDEX HERD MATE YELLOW *47 STILL RUNNING LOOSE IN INDIANA, YELLOW NUMBER 2 STILL MISSING, AND OTHERS ON THE RUN STILL IN LOUISIANA
 
 
Monday, June 24, 2013
 
The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery
 
 
Tuesday, June 11, 2013
 
CWD GONE WILD, More cervid escapees from more shooting pens on the loose in Pennsylvania
 
 
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
 
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013
 
6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.
 
 
Thursday, October 11, 2012
 
Pennsylvania Confirms First Case CWD Adams County Captive Deer Tests Positive
 
 
Wednesday, November 07, 2012
 
PENNSYLVANIA Second Adams County Deer Tests Positive for Chronic Wasting Disease
 
 
Tuesday, November 06, 2012
 
PA Department of Agriculture investigating possible 2nd case of chronic wasting disease
 
 
Thursday, November 01, 2012
 
PA GAME COMMISSION TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING TO DISCUSS CWD Release #128-12
 
 
Tuesday, November 13, 2012
 
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD
 
 
Monday, June 24, 2013
 
The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery
 
 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012
 
PENNSYLVANIA 2012 THE GREAT ESCAPE OF CWD INVESTIGATION MOVES INTO LOUISIANA and INDIANA
 
 
Pennsylvania CWD number of deer exposed and farms there from much greater than first thought
 
Published: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 10:44 PM Updated: Wednesday, October 17, 2012, 11:33 PM
 
 
Tuesday, October 23, 2012
 
PA Captive deer from CWD-positive farm roaming free
 
 
Wednesday, September 04, 2013
 
***cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild...
 
 
Thursday, August 08, 2013
 
Characterization of the first case of naturally occurring chronic wasting disease in a captive red deer (Cervus elaphus) in North America
 
 
Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club
 
Friday, March 28, 2014 Concerned about captive deer operations transmitting diseases to wild herds, the Boone and Crockett Club now officially supports state bans on commercial import and export of deer or elk.
 
The Club also opposes efforts to relax regulation of captive cervid breeding operations or to remove management authority over such operations from state wildlife agencies.
 
A full position statement, posted here, was passed at the Club’s December meeting.
 
The Club’s concerns were reinforced at the recent Whitetail Summit hosted by the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA), the first summit to focus on key issues and challenges facing free-ranging white-tailed deer.
 
“Of all the presentations, seminars and findings, I was most pleased to see the attention given to the connections between chronic wasting disease (CWD) and the game farming industry. This has been on our radar, and on the radar of QDMA, other conservation groups, state agencies and sportsmen for quite some time,” said Richard Hale, chairman of the Club’s Records Committee.
 
Hale added, “Congratulations to QDMA on one of the most impressive and well-run summits I’ve had the pleasure of attending and for keeping this issue front and center.”
 
CWD is a degenerative brain disease that affects elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, and moose. The disease can be transmitted by direct animal-to-animal contact through saliva, feces and urine, and indirectly through environmental contamination. CWD is fatal in deer, elk and moose, but there is no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans, according to the CDC and The World Health Organization.
 
Documented cases of CWD have been found in captive and/or wild deer and elk in 22 states and two Canadian provinces. In some, but not all, cases where the disease has been found in wild populations, the disease is present in captive populations within these regions.
 
In 2002, the Boone and Crockett Club, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Mule Deer Foundation formed the CWD Alliance. Its purpose was to pool resources, share information and collaborate on ways to positively address the CWD issue. Other organizations have since joined the Alliance, including QDMA and the Wildlife Management Institute, which now administers the Alliance website www.cwd-info.org.
 
“Evidence strongly suggests that captive animals infected with CWD can serve as the source for the spread of the disease to other captive animals, and between captive animals and wild populations,” said Hale. “To reduce the risk to wild deer populations, several states passed laws prohibiting game farming or live captive deer and elk importation, but now they are fighting efforts to expand captive deer and elk breeding and shooting operations within their jurisdictions. The captive cervid industry is persistent in proposing new legislations to overturn these laws, or transfer the authority of captive deer and elk from state fish and game agencies to their respective departments of agriculture.”
 
No vaccine or treatment is available for animals infected with CWD and once established in a population, culling or complete depopulation to eradicate CWD has provided only marginal results. In fact, the prevalence of CWD is rising at an alarming rate in some infected wild deer populations. Prevention is the only truly effective technique for managing diseases in free-ranging wildlife populations. Consequently, what can be done is minimizing the spread of CWD by restricting intra- and interstate transportation captive, privately owned wildlife, which frequently occurs in game farming.
 
 
boone and crockett club position statement
 
REGULATION OF GAME FARMS First Adopted December 7, 2013 - Updated December 7, 2013
 
Situational Overview
 
The captive cervid industry, also referred to as game farming, uses artificial means to breed captive deer, elk, and other cervids for sale in shooting preserve operations. These game farms commonly transport captive deer and elk to other shooting preserves in a state or in other states.
 
Transportation of captive, game farm animals has been shown to increase the risk of spreading parasites and infectious, diseases, such as chronic wasting disease (CWD) and bovine tuberculosis, to other captive and wild cervids in new locations. There is currently no way of testing live animals for CWD, and infected animals show no signs for at least 16-18 months post-infection. There is no vaccine, and despite fenced enclosures, captive animals often come in contact with wild populations thereby spreading diseases. Once CWD is present, the area cannot be decontaminated even if infected animals are removed. As a result, many states have banned or are attempting to ban the importation of captive cervids (as well as intact carcasses of hunter-killed, wild cervids) to lower the risk of spreading CWD and other infectious diseases.
 
Position
 
The Boone and Crockett Club supports state bans on importing or exporting captive deer and elk by game farming operations in order to protect the health of native populations. The Club opposes any legislation aimed at relaxing regulations governing captive cervid breeding operations or removing management authority over such operations from state wildlife agencies. The Club does not oppose the transportation of wild cervids by state agencies and non-governmental organizations for the purpose of re-establishing wild game animals to their historic, open ranges.
 
The breeding of captive deer, elk, and other cervids for profit to create abnormally large “trophy” animals for fenced shoots under non-fair chase conditions are addressed in the Boone and Crockett Club’s positions on “Genetic Manipulation of Game” and “Canned Shoots.”
 
 
Saturday, March 29, 2014
 
Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club
 
 
Sunday, April 06, 2014
 
The Conservation Federation of Missouri is Opposed to the Transfer of Captive White-tailed Deer Management
 
 
THE LANCET Infectious Diseases Vol 3 August 2003
 
Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
 
 
Friday, December 14, 2012
 
DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012
 
snip...
 
In the USA, under the Food and Drug Administration’s BSE Feed Regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) most material (exceptions include milk, tallow, and gelatin) from deer and elk is prohibited for use in feed for ruminant animals. With regards to feed for non-ruminant animals, under FDA law, CWD positive deer may not be used for any animal feed or feed ingredients. For elk and deer considered at high risk for CWD, the FDA recommends that these animals do not enter the animal feed system. However, this recommendation is guidance and not a requirement by law.
 
Animals considered at high risk for CWD include:
 
1) animals from areas declared to be endemic for CWD and/or to be CWD eradication zones and
 
2) deer and elk that at some time during the 60-month period prior to slaughter were in a captive herd that contained a CWD-positive animal.
 
Therefore, in the USA, materials from cervids other than CWD positive animals may be used in animal feed and feed ingredients for non-ruminants.
 
The amount of animal PAP that is of deer and/or elk origin imported from the USA to GB can not be determined, however, as it is not specified in TRACES. It may constitute a small percentage of the 8412 kilos of non-fish origin processed animal proteins that were imported from US into GB in 2011.
 
Overall, therefore, it is considered there is a __greater than negligible risk___ that (nonruminant) animal feed and pet food containing deer and/or elk protein is imported into GB.
 
There is uncertainty associated with this estimate given the lack of data on the amount of deer and/or elk protein possibly being imported in these products.
 
snip...
 
36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).
 
The clinical signs of CWD in affected adults are weight loss and behavioural changes that can span weeks or months (Williams, 2005). In addition, signs might include excessive salivation, behavioural alterations including a fixed stare and changes in interaction with other animals in the herd, and an altered stance (Williams, 2005). These signs are indistinguishable from cervids experimentally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).
 
Given this, if CWD was to be introduced into countries with BSE such as GB, for example, infected deer populations would need to be tested to differentiate if they were infected with CWD or BSE to minimise the risk of BSE entering the human food-chain via affected venison.
 
snip...
 
The rate of transmission of CWD has been reported to be as high as 30% and can approach 100% among captive animals in endemic areas (Safar et al., 2008).
 
snip...
 
In summary, in endemic areas, there is a medium probability that the soil and surrounding environment is contaminated with CWD prions and in a bioavailable form. In rural areas where CWD has not been reported and deer are present, there is a greater than negligible risk the soil is contaminated with CWD prion.
 
snip...
 
In summary, given the volume of tourists, hunters and servicemen moving between GB and North America, the probability of at least one person travelling to/from a CWD affected area and, in doing so, contaminating their clothing, footwear and/or equipment prior to arriving in GB is greater than negligible. For deer hunters, specifically, the risk is likely to be greater given the increased contact with deer and their environment. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with these estimates.
 
snip...
 
Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.
 
snip...
 
 
Singeltary submission ;
 
Program Standards: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose
 
*** DOCUMENT ID: APHIS-2006-0118-0411
 
 
Wednesday, September 04, 2013
 
*** cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild
 
 
*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep. ...
 
also, see where even decades back, the USDA had the same thought as they do today with CWD, not their problem...see page 27 below as well, where USDA stated back then, the same thing they stated in the state of Pennsylvania, not their damn business, once they escape, and they said the same thing about CWD in general back then ;
 
”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.
 
 
OLD HISTORY ON CWD AND GAME FARMS IN USA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Monday, March 03, 2014
 
*** APHIS to Offer Indemnity for CWD Positive Herds as Part of Its Cervid Health Activities ???
 
 
Saturday, February 04, 2012
 
*** Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
 
 
Sunday, September 01, 2013
 
*** hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease
 
 
Monday, October 07, 2013
 
The importance of localized culling in stabilizing chronic wasting disease prevalence in white-tailed deer populations
 
 
Friday, March 07, 2014
 
37th Annual Southeast Deer Study Group Meeting in Athens, Georgia (CWD TSE Prion abstracts)
 
 
Saturday, March 15, 2014
 
Potential role of soil properties in the spread of CWD in western Canada
 
 
Inactivation of the TSE Prion disease
 
Chronic Wasting Disease CWD, and other TSE prion disease, these TSE prions know no borders.
 
these TSE prions know no age restrictions.
 
The TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit.
 
you cannot cook the TSE prion disease out of meat.
 
you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE.
 
Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well.
 
the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes.
 
IN fact, you should also know that the TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades.
 
you can bury it and it will not go away.
 
The TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area.
 
it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with. that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.
 
Sunday, March 30, 2014
 
*** Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates ***
 
 
*** our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions. ***
 
 
Thursday, January 2, 2014
 
*** CWD TSE Prion in cervids to hTGmice, Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease MM1 genotype, and iatrogenic CJD ??? ***
 
 
Environmental Geochemistry and Health
 
April 2014
 
Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer
 
Michael J. Lavelle, Gregory E. Phillips, Justin W. Fischer, Patrick W. Burke, Nathan W. Seward, Randal S. Stahl, Tracy A. Nichols, Bruce A. Wunder, Kurt C. VerCauteren … show all 9 hide
 
Abstract
 
Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids.
 
 
Elk and Deer Use of Mineral Licks: Implications for Disease Transmission
 
Kurt C. VerCauteren1*, Michael J. Lavelle1, Gregory E. Phillips1, Justin W. Fischer1, and Randal S. Stahl1 1United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521-2154, USA *Cooresponding author e-mail: kurt.c.vercauteren@aphis.usda.gov
 
North American cervids require and actively seek out minerals to satisfy physiological requirements. Minerals required by free-ranging cervids exist within natural and artificial mineral licks that commonly serve as focal sites for cervids. Ingestion of soils contaminated with the agent that causes chronic wasting disease (CWD) may result in risk of contracting CWD. Our objective was to evaluate the extent and nature of use of mineral licks by CWD-susceptible cervid species. We used animal-activated cameras to monitor use of 18 mineral licks between 1 June and 16 October 2006 in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado. We also assessed mineral concentrations at mineral licks to evaluate correlations between visitation rates and site-specific characteristics. We collected > 400,000 images of which 991 included elk, 293 included deer, and 6 included moose. We documented elk and deer participating in a variety of potentially risky behaviors (e.g., ingesting soil, ingesting water, defecating, urinating) while at mineral licks. Results from the mineral analyses combined with camera data revealed that visitation was highest at sodium-rich mineral licks. Mineral licks may play a role in disease transmission by acting as sites of increased interaction as well as reservoirs for deposition, accumulation, and ingestion of disease agents.
 
 
 
Sunday, December 29, 2013
 
Impacts of wildlife baiting and supplemental feeding on infectious disease transmission risk: A synthesis of knowledge
 
 
Friday, October 26, 2012
 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PENNSYLVANIA GAME FARMS, URINE ATTRACTANT PRODUCTS, BAITING, AND MINERAL LICKS
 
 
Sunday, September 01, 2013
 
hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease
 
 
New studies on the heat resistance of hamster-adapted scrapie agent: Threshold survival after ashing at 600°C suggests an inorganic template of replication
 
 
Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production
 
 
Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area
 
 
A Quantitative Assessment of the Amount of Prion Diverted to Category 1 Materials and Wastewater During Processing
 
 
Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals
 
 
PPo4-4:
 
Survival and Limited Spread of TSE Infectivity after Burial
 
 
Sunday, April 13, 2014
 
Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer
 
Environmental Geochemistry and Health
 
 
TSS
 
 

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer

Environmental Geochemistry and Health

 

April 2014

 

Mineral licks: motivational factors for visitation and accompanying disease risk at communal use sites of elk and deer

 

Michael J. Lavelle, Gregory E. Phillips, Justin W. Fischer, Patrick W. Burke, Nathan W. Seward, Randal S. Stahl, Tracy A. Nichols, Bruce A. Wunder, Kurt C. VerCauteren … show all 9 hide

 

Abstract

 

Free-ranging cervids acquire most of their essential minerals through forage consumption, though occasionally seek other sources to account for seasonal mineral deficiencies. Mineral sources occur as natural geological deposits (i.e., licks) or as anthropogenic mineral supplements. In both scenarios, these sources commonly serve as focal sites for visitation. We monitored 11 licks in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado, using trail cameras to quantify daily visitation indices (DVI) and soil consumption indices (SCI) for Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during summer 2006 and documented elk, mule deer, and moose (Alces alces) visiting licks. Additionally, soil samples were collected, and mineral concentrations were compared to discern levels that explain rates of visitation. Relationships between response variables; DVI and SCI, and explanatory variables; elevation class, moisture class, period of study, and concentrations of minerals were examined. We found that DVI and SCI were greatest at two wet, low-elevation licks exhibiting relatively high concentrations of manganese and sodium. Because cervids are known to seek Na from soils, we suggest our observed association of Mn with DVI and SCI was a likely consequence of deer and elk seeking supplemental dietary Na. Additionally, highly utilized licks such as these provide an area of concentrated cervid occupation and interaction, thus increasing risk for environmental transmission of infectious pathogens such as chronic wasting disease, which has been shown to be shed in the saliva, urine, and feces of infected cervids.

 


 

Elk and Deer Use of Mineral Licks: Implications for Disease Transmission

 

Kurt C. VerCauteren1*, Michael J. Lavelle1, Gregory E. Phillips1, Justin W. Fischer1, and Randal S. Stahl1 1United States Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 4101 LaPorte Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521-2154, USA *Cooresponding author e-mail: kurt.c.vercauteren@aphis.usda.gov

 

North American cervids require and actively seek out minerals to satisfy physiological requirements. Minerals required by free-ranging cervids exist within natural and artificial mineral licks that commonly serve as focal sites for cervids. Ingestion of soils contaminated with the agent that causes chronic wasting disease (CWD) may result in risk of contracting CWD. Our objective was to evaluate the extent and nature of use of mineral licks by CWD-susceptible cervid species. We used animal-activated cameras to monitor use of 18 mineral licks between 1 June and 16 October 2006 in Rocky Mountain National Park, north-central Colorado. We also assessed mineral concentrations at mineral licks to evaluate correlations between visitation rates and site-specific characteristics. We collected > 400,000 images of which 991 included elk, 293 included deer, and 6 included moose. We documented elk and deer participating in a variety of potentially risky behaviors (e.g., ingesting soil, ingesting water, defecating, urinating) while at mineral licks. Results from the mineral analyses combined with camera data revealed that visitation was highest at sodium-rich mineral licks. Mineral licks may play a role in disease transmission by acting as sites of increased interaction as well as reservoirs for deposition, accumulation, and ingestion of disease agents.

 


 


 

Sunday, December 29, 2013

 

Impacts of wildlife baiting and supplemental feeding on infectious disease transmission risk: A synthesis of knowledge

 


 

Friday, October 26, 2012

 

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE CWD PENNSYLVANIA GAME FARMS, URINE ATTRACTANT PRODUCTS, BAITING, AND MINERAL LICKS

 


 

Sunday, September 01, 2013

 

hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease

 


 

New studies on the heat resistance of hamster-adapted scrapie agent: Threshold survival after ashing at 600°C suggests an inorganic template of replication

 


 

Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production

 


 

Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area

 


 

A Quantitative Assessment of the Amount of Prion Diverted to Category 1 Materials and Wastewater During Processing

 


 

Rapid assessment of bovine spongiform encephalopathy prion inactivation by heat treatment in yellow grease produced in the industrial manufacturing process of meat and bone meals

 


 

PPo4-4:

 

Survival and Limited Spread of TSE Infectivity after Burial

 


 

 

TSS

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ALDEER.COM/

 
LET THE TRUTH BE KNOWN, SINGELTARY WAS BANNED FOR SPEAKING ABOUT CWD AND GAME FARMS THERE FROM @ ALDEER.COM/


 

PROOF IS THE LAST COMMENT FROM THE GUVNER SKINNY. IT’S NOT MY FIRST RODEO WITH A HUNTING FORUM THAT WAS/is PRO SHOOTING PEN, THAT DO NOT WANT ME TO POST ABOUT CWD. BOTTOM LINE, I HAD BEEN BANNED and or, not allowed to sign in and post, take your pick, FOR MONTHS, AND _NEVER_ GIVEN A CHANCE, AND WHEN FINALLY LET ON TO POST, THE CWD WAS JUST TOO MUCH, AND THEY SIMPLY DID NOT WANT TO HEAR ABOUT IT, SO I _WAS BANNED_. I NEVER CUSSED, NEVER WAS RUDE, NEVER POSTED ANYTHING OTHER THAN THE SCIENCE ON CWD. IN FACT, I WAS ASK TO COME TO ALDEER.COM SOME TIME BACK AND SPEAK ABOUT CWD. CENSORSHIP IS A TERRIBLE THING, CWD IS WORSE. ...GOOD LUCK WITH THAT ALABAMA...TSS

 

 

BOTTOM LINE BY THE MODERATOR ;

 

 

"but your weird OCD about CWD is really annoying"

 

 

 


#932417 - 40 minutes 37 seconds ago Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Skinny Offline GUVNER

Registered: 08/25/01
Posts: 29832
Loc: Luverne, AL
flounder, every admin and mod here gave you a chance but your weird OCD about CWD is really annoying. Hope all the best to you, CYA

_________________________
"You can be broke but you cant be poor." Ruthie-May Webster
 

 

Sent: Monday, April 07, 2014 11:57 AM
To: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Cc: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Subject: Re: aldeer.com ban on Singeltary ???
 

 
greetings aldeer.com et al,
 
I have been on aldeer.com forum for a while, some one back when, I did not know, ask me to sign up and post some on cwd, but have not been able to post for some time. I was wondering if I had been banned from posting? my main concern is CWD. I post on many hunting forums, and it is a difficult and controversial topic. but it is very important to me, and as a layperson, I have studied and kept up with the scientific research daily. I was wondering if you could at least tell my why I was banned, if I was banned, please ? not going to argue, but I need to know, because if so, I am going to move on to another hunting forum in Alabama. I am trying to stay ahead of the cwd, from state to state, but that’s becoming difficult.
 
thank you,
 
kind regards, terry
 
 
====================================
 
 
Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club

Friday, March 28, 2014 Concerned about captive deer operations transmitting diseases to wild herds, the Boone and Crockett Club now officially supports state bans on commercial import and export of deer or elk.

The Club also opposes efforts to relax regulation of captive cervid breeding operations or to remove management authority over such operations from state wildlife agencies.

A full position statement, posted here, was passed at the Club’s December meeting.

The Club’s concerns were reinforced at the recent Whitetail Summit hosted by the Quality Deer Management Association (QDMA), the first summit to focus on key issues and challenges facing free-ranging white-tailed deer.

“Of all the presentations, seminars and findings, I was most pleased to see the attention given to the connections between chronic wasting disease (CWD) and the game farming industry. This has been on our radar, and on the radar of QDMA, other conservation groups, state agencies and sportsmen for quite some time,” said Richard Hale, chairman of the Club’s Records Committee.

Hale added, “Congratulations to QDMA on one of the most impressive and well-run summits I’ve had the pleasure of attending and for keeping this issue front and center.”

CWD is a degenerative brain disease that affects elk, mule deer, white-tailed deer, and moose. The disease can be transmitted by direct animal-to-animal contact through saliva, feces and urine, and indirectly through environmental contamination. CWD is fatal in deer, elk and moose, but there is no evidence that CWD can be transmitted to humans, according to the CDC and The World Health Organization.

Documented cases of CWD have been found in captive and/or wild deer and elk in 22 states and two Canadian provinces. In some, but not all, cases where the disease has been found in wild populations, the disease is present in captive populations within these regions.

In 2002, the Boone and Crockett Club, Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and the Mule Deer Foundation formed the CWD Alliance. Its purpose was to pool resources, share information and collaborate on ways to positively address the CWD issue. Other organizations have since joined the Alliance, including QDMA and the Wildlife Management Institute, which now administers the Alliance website
www.cwd-info.org.

“Evidence strongly suggests that captive animals infected with CWD can serve as the source for the spread of the disease to other captive animals, and between captive animals and wild populations,” said Hale. “To reduce the risk to wild deer populations, several states passed laws prohibiting game farming or live captive deer and elk importation, but now they are fighting efforts to expand captive deer and elk breeding and shooting operations within their jurisdictions. The captive cervid industry is persistent in proposing new legislations to overturn these laws, or transfer the authority of captive deer and elk from state fish and game agencies to their respective departments of agriculture.”

No vaccine or treatment is available for animals infected with CWD and once established in a population, culling or complete depopulation to eradicate CWD has provided only marginal results. In fact, the prevalence of CWD is rising at an alarming rate in some infected wild deer populations. Prevention is the only truly effective technique for managing diseases in free-ranging wildlife populations. Consequently, what can be done is minimizing the spread of CWD by restricting intra- and interstate transportation captive, privately owned wildlife, which frequently occurs in game farming.
http://www.boone-crockett.org/news/featured_story.asp?area=news&ID=204

boone and crockett club position statement

REGULATION OF GAME FARMS First Adopted December 7, 2013 - Updated December 7, 2013

Situational Overview

The captive cervid industry, also referred to as game farming, uses artificial means to breed captive deer, elk, and other cervids for sale in shooting preserve operations. These game farms commonly transport captive deer and elk to other shooting preserves in a state or in other states.

Transportation of captive, game farm animals has been shown to increase the risk of spreading parasites and infectious, diseases, such as chronic wasting disease (CWD) and bovine tuberculosis, to other captive and wild cervids in new locations. There is currently no way of testing live animals for CWD, and infected animals show no signs for at least 16-18 months post-infection. There is no vaccine, and despite fenced enclosures, captive animals often come in contact with wild populations thereby spreading diseases. Once CWD is present, the area cannot be decontaminated even if infected animals are removed. As a result, many states have banned or are attempting to ban the importation of captive cervids (as well as intact carcasses of hunter-killed, wild cervids) to lower the risk of spreading CWD and other infectious diseases.

Position

The Boone and Crockett Club supports state bans on importing or exporting captive deer and elk by game farming operations in order to protect the health of native populations. The Club opposes any legislation aimed at relaxing regulations governing captive cervid breeding operations or removing management authority over such operations from state wildlife agencies. The Club does not oppose the transportation of wild cervids by state agencies and non-governmental organizations for the purpose of re-establishing wild game animals to their historic, open ranges.

The breeding of captive deer, elk, and other cervids for profit to create abnormally large “trophy” animals for fenced shoots under non-fair chase conditions are addressed in the Boone and Crockett Club’s positions on “Genetic Manipulation of Game” and “Canned Shoots.”
http://www.boone-crockett.org/about/posi...p;se=1&te=1 


Sunday, April 06, 2014

The Conservation Federation of Missouri is Opposed to the Transfer of Captive White-tailed Deer Management
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/04/the-conservation-federation-of-missouri.html


THE LANCET Infectious Diseases Vol 3 August 2003

Tracking spongiform encephalopathies in North America
http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/laninf/PIIS1473309903007151.pdf?id=baa1CkXPkhI3Ih_Vlh6ru

Friday, December 14, 2012

DEFRA U.K. What is the risk of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD being introduced into Great Britain? A Qualitative Risk Assessment October 2012

snip...

In the USA, under the Food and Drug Administration’s BSE Feed Regulation (21 CFR 589.2000) most material (exceptions include milk, tallow, and gelatin) from deer and elk is prohibited for use in feed for ruminant animals. With regards to feed for non-ruminant animals, under FDA law, CWD positive deer may not be used for any animal feed or feed ingredients. For elk and deer considered at high risk for CWD, the FDA recommends that these animals do not enter the animal feed system. However, this recommendation is guidance and not a requirement by law.

Animals considered at high risk for CWD include:

1) animals from areas declared to be endemic for CWD and/or to be CWD eradication zones and

2) deer and elk that at some time during the 60-month period prior to slaughter were in a captive herd that contained a CWD-positive animal.

Therefore, in the USA, materials from cervids other than CWD positive animals may be used in animal feed and feed ingredients for non-ruminants.

The amount of animal PAP that is of deer and/or elk origin imported from the USA to GB can not be determined, however, as it is not specified in TRACES. It may constitute a small percentage of the 8412 kilos of non-fish origin processed animal proteins that were imported from US into GB in 2011.

Overall, therefore, it is considered there is a __greater than negligible risk___ that (nonruminant) animal feed and pet food containing deer and/or elk protein is imported into GB.

There is uncertainty associated with this estimate given the lack of data on the amount of deer and/or elk protein possibly being imported in these products.

snip...

36% in 2007 (Almberg et al., 2011). In such areas, population declines of deer of up to 30 to 50% have been observed (Almberg et al., 2011). In areas of Colorado, the prevalence can be as high as 30% (EFSA, 2011).

The clinical signs of CWD in affected adults are weight loss and behavioural changes that can span weeks or months (Williams, 2005). In addition, signs might include excessive salivation, behavioural alterations including a fixed stare and changes in interaction with other animals in the herd, and an altered stance (Williams, 2005). These signs are indistinguishable from cervids experimentally infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).

Given this, if CWD was to be introduced into countries with BSE such as GB, for example, infected deer populations would need to be tested to differentiate if they were infected with CWD or BSE to minimise the risk of BSE entering the human food-chain via affected venison.

snip...

The rate of transmission of CWD has been reported to be as high as 30% and can approach 100% among captive animals in endemic areas (Safar et al., 2008).

snip...

In summary, in endemic areas, there is a medium probability that the soil and surrounding environment is contaminated with CWD prions and in a bioavailable form. In rural areas where CWD has not been reported and deer are present, there is a greater than negligible risk the soil is contaminated with CWD prion.

snip...

In summary, given the volume of tourists, hunters and servicemen moving between GB and North America, the probability of at least one person travelling to/from a CWD affected area and, in doing so, contaminating their clothing, footwear and/or equipment prior to arriving in GB is greater than negligible. For deer hunters, specifically, the risk is likely to be greater given the increased contact with deer and their environment. However, there is significant uncertainty associated with these estimates.

snip...

Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.

snip...
http://www.defra.gov.uk/animal-diseases/files/qra_chronic-wasting-disease-121029.pdf 

Singeltary submission ;

Program Standards: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose

*** DOCUMENT ID: APHIS-2006-0118-0411

http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=APHIS-2006-0118-0411


Saturday, March 29, 2014

Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/game-farm-cwd-concerns-rise-at-boone.html

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

*** cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/09/cwd-cervid-captive-livestock-escapes.html

*** Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep. ...

also, see where even decades back, the USDA had the same thought as they do today with CWD, not their problem...see page 27 below as well, where USDA stated back then, the same thing they stated in the state of Pennsylvania, not their damn business, once they escape, and they said the same thing about CWD in general back then ;

”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.

http://collections.europarchive.org/tna/20080102193705/http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf


”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” ...page 26.

sound familiar $$$

Sunday, January 06, 2013

USDA TO PGC ONCE CAPTIVES ESCAPE

*** "it‘s no longer its business.”
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/01/usda-to-pgc-once-captives-escape-its-no.html

Saturday, June 29, 2013

PENNSYLVANIA CAPTIVE CWD INDEX HERD MATE YELLOW *47 STILL RUNNING LOOSE IN INDIANA, YELLOW NUMBER 2 STILL MISSING, AND OTHERS ON THE RUN STILL IN LOUISIANA
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/06/pennsylvania-captive-cwd-index-herd.html

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013

*** 6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/05/chronic-wasting-disease-cwd-quarantine.html

Thursday, October 03, 2013

*** TAHC ADOPTS CWD RULE THAT the amendments REMOVE the requirement for a specific fence height for captives

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)

ANNOUNCEMENT

October 3, 2013
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/10/tahc-adopts-cwd-rule-that-amendments.html

Monday, March 03, 2014

*** APHIS to Offer Indemnity for CWD Positive Herds as Part of Its Cervid Health Activities ???
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/aphis-to-offer-indemnity-for-cwd.html

Saturday, February 04, 2012

*** Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2012/02/wisconsin-16-age-limit-on-testing-dead.html

Sunday, November 3, 2013

*** Environmental Impact Statements; Availability, etc.: Animal Carcass Management [Docket No. APHIS-2013-0044]
 


Sunday, September 01, 2013

*** hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/09/hunting-over-gut-piles-and-cwd-tse.html


Monday, October 07, 2013

The importance of localized culling in stabilizing chronic wasting disease prevalence in white-tailed deer populations
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-importance-of-localized-culling-in.html


Friday, March 07, 2014

37th Annual Southeast Deer Study Group Meeting in Athens, Georgia (CWD TSE Prion abstracts)
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/37th-annual-southeast-deer-study-group.html

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Potential role of soil properties in the spread of CWD in western Canada
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/potential-role-of-soil-properties-in.html


Inactivation of the TSE Prion disease

Chronic Wasting Disease CWD, and other TSE prion disease, these TSE prions know no borders.

these TSE prions know no age restrictions.

The TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit.

you cannot cook the TSE prion disease out of meat.

you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE.

Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well.

the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes.

IN fact, you should also know that the TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades.

you can bury it and it will not go away.

The TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area.

it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with. that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.

Sunday, March 30, 2014

*** Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates ***
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/chronic-wasting-disease-agents-in.html


*** our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions. ***
http://www.jbc.org/cgi/content/abstract/...ourcetype=HWCIT


Thursday, January 2, 2014

*** CWD TSE Prion in cervids to hTGmice, Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease MM1 genotype, and iatrogenic CJD ??? ***
 
 

 

Terry S. Singeltary Sr.
 
 
===========END OF MY POST THAT GOT ME BANNED============
 
 
===========THE REST OF THE THREAD THAT FOLLOWS==========
 
 
 

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#927149 - 04/07/14 11:17 PM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
turkey247 Offline 4 point

Registered: 02/04/11
Posts: 336
Loc: LASW
How dare facts be used to question a way of hunting restricted to the wealthy.

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#927351 - 04/08/14 09:31 AM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
hunting13 Offline 4 point

Registered: 10/19/11
Posts: 401
Loc: Tuscaloosa
All hunting will be done by the wealthy soon enough I'm afraid.

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#928014 - 04/08/14 06:33 PM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Sgiles Offline spike

Registered: 12/14/13
Posts: 47
Loc: Etowah
True and true

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#928675 - 04/09/14 09:35 AM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Tuesday, April 08, 2014

Pennsylvania Chronic wasting disease found in another deer farm
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/04/pennsylvania-chronic-wasting-disease.html



kind regards,
terry

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#928684 - 04/09/14 09:45 AM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: hunting13]
Clem Offline Mildly Quirky

Registered: 12/31/02
Posts: 26194
Loc: Parts Unknown
Quote:
All hunting will be done by the wealthy soon enough I'm afraid.


Have heard this for 30 years. Still isn't happening. Plenty of us common folk still hunting.

Lump this phrase in with "We need to get more kids involved!" ... "Women are the key!" ... "Bowhunting popularity is rising!" and the repeated "MY television show is new, fresh and different from everyone else's!"

_________________________
"Hunting Politics are stupid!" - Farm Hunter

"Bible says you shouldn't put sugar in your cornbread." Dustin, 2013



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#928851 - 04/09/14 12:03 PM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
hunting13 Offline 4 point

Registered: 10/19/11
Posts: 401
Loc: Tuscaloosa

Top

#931228 - 04/11/14 04:33 PM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: hunting13]
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: hunting13



the other side, to the other side of the story your speaking of ;


keith warren is pro shooting pen, a game farm lover, that hunts on these shooting pens, and owns one, so the truth about game farms, so the truth about CWD video he produced, is far from the truth, in my honest opinion...

Keith Warren's deer breeding farm in Texas After just watching Keith Warrens's show this morning, I almost threw up. This guy has a HUGE deer breeding farm in Texas. They raise them like cattle using Artificial Insemination, Genetic breeding, and no doubt growth hormones. They sell these human engineered deer to other "ranches" and canned hunt operators. Man, what has the world of hunting come to? How many of these animal are shot and make it into the record books? How is it even legal? In most states it is illegal to capture or pen up wild animals. He even brags about how they can get them to grow huge antlers in two to three years when it would take a wild deer five or six years. It's all about the big bucks.( I mean the green kind). It must make you feel good to go pay several thousand bucks to shoot one of these clones, then beat your chest like you shot a wild one. I know I am getting old but this in my opinion is greed to the max
http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=870943

Keith Warren ranch
http://texashiddenspringsranch.com/

Hunt Packages Trophy Hunts

Our hunters can choose any buck they want to harvest off of the ranch with no deer off limits. Trophy hunts are three days/ three nights and are fully guided, including home cooked meals and lodging. Price: $7,000 up to 200″ (over 200″ call for price)

Management Hunts

On this two and a half day / two night guided hunt, you and your guide will be looking for bucks that are old enough to be entering what we call “the breeding pool.” By this age (3 1/2) a buck should display trophy antler potential. If it doesn’t, then our goal is to remove it from the herd before it has a chance to breed. Most of those bucks will have 8 points. With this package, guides will determine which deer falls in the management category, keeping in mind we want hunters to get the largest management buck available. Some of our management bucks will surprise you. Most of our management bucks will score between 130-140″. We do have some that may be even larger. Our largest management buck was a 158″ bruiser. Price: $3,000 ($2,500 for double occupancy.)

Included in all Packages

Hunters can also take the following species at NO CHARGE during their hunt if the opportunity arises: javelina, bobcat, coyote, badger, skunk, opossum, raccoon and gray fox. We encourage our hunters to take as many feral hogs as possible during the hunt in an effort to eliminate them from the property. Hogs are also no additional charge.
http://texashiddenspringsranch.com/hunt-packages/ https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en#hl=en&q=keith+warren+ranch+show



Saturday, March 29, 2014

Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2014/03/game-farm-cwd-concerns-rise-at-boone.html


Wednesday, September 04, 2013

*** cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild
http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2013/09/cwd-cervid-captive-livestock-escapes.html



tss

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#931595 - Yesterday at 09:23 AM
 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Skinny Offline GUVNER

Registered: 08/25/01
Posts: 29832
Loc: Luverne, AL
flounder, we all agree that CWD is a problem, but you are coming across as a spammer.

_________________________
"You can be broke but you cant be poor." Ruthie-May Webster

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#932272 - Today at 10:03 AM 
Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: Skinny]
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: Skinny
flounder, we all agree that CWD is a problem, but you are coming across as a spammer.



everybody has a right to their own opinion. I respect yours.

but if posting a shooting pen propaganda video by a shooting pen owner, about game farms, full of junk science on cwd, as a reply to my post, if that is/was not spamming, I guess I don't know what is.and then me replying with evidence of just what this propaganda video is about i.e. deer for sale as livestock, $2,000. plus a pop, the history of these antler mills, sperm mills, urine mills, game farms and such, if showing this forum the history and evidence there from that indeed these game farms are a real threat to the wild cervid herds in every state due to cwd from interstate transportation, and the voluntary cwd movement plan by USDA, and the fact that will fail before it even gets started, if that's spamming, I guess I am guilty as charged. I simply call it discussing or debating an issue. for months and months I could not post at all on this forum (for whatever reason?), then I write to whomever I could get in touch with on this forum, and a few others trying to let me post, finally, finally, someone helps me get this problem solved, and I make one post about cwd and game farms, and then follow up with a few replies with scientific facts, and it's spamming? really? i am beginning to think that aldeer.com is bordering censorship? i guess time will tell...

terry

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#932280 - Today at 10:30 AM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Shaw Offline The Keeblerizer

Registered: 04/15/00
Posts: 12461
Loc: Fosters, Alabama, USA
Flounder, you were never banned or prevented from posting. Whatever issues you had with be able to post were on your end.

_________________________
"I hate rude behavior in a man. I won't tolerate it." - Captain Woodrow F. Call

ShawBuilt Custom Bowstrings - Fosters, Alabama
Mathews Solocam Catch Us If You Can!

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#932287 - Today at 10:42 AM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: Shaw]
swamp_fever2002 Offline Freak of Nature

Registered: 12/20/01
Posts: 25868
Loc: Missouri
Originally Posted By: Shaw
Flounder, you were never banned or prevented from posting. Whatever issues you had with be able to post were on your end.


X2

_________________________


It takes a long time to grow an old friend.

Top

#932314 - Today at 11:34 AM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Clem Offline Mildly Quirky

Registered: 12/31/02
Posts: 26194
Loc: Parts Unknown
Quote:
i am beginning to think that aldeer.com is bordering censorship?


This site is privately owned. The owners - four of them - can do whatever they want in regard to any person/persona on this board.

The First Amendment guarantees everyone the right to free speech. It does not guarantee anyone prevention, protection from or the absence of repercussion of that speech.

_________________________
"Hunting Politics are stupid!" - Farm Hunter

"Bible says you shouldn't put sugar in your cornbread." Dustin, 2013



Top

#932316 - Today at 11:39 AM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: Skinny]
Frankie Online   content 10 point

Registered: 04/15/00
Posts: 4112
Loc: Clanton , Al
Originally Posted By: Skinny
flounder, we all agree that CWD is a problem, but you are coming across as a spammer.



thought the same thing wayyyyyyyy back in his second or third topic. i still think he's a pot stirrer , lol

_________________________
My Hunting Page

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#932395 - Today at 02:27 PM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: Shaw]
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: Shaw
Flounder, you were never banned or prevented from posting. Whatever issues you had with be able to post were on your end.





I hope that's the case, nothing on my end was malfunctioning or down. i could log in, and then was dropped as soon as i tried to post. as i said, this went on for months. after i had enough of that, I had privately written about 5 or 6 members recently, it finally got fixed. Thank you very much, regardless the problem. then i posted about cwd, now i am called a spammer. really?

in regards to me being a pot stirrer, if trying to educate the public about CWD is stirring the pot with the latest scientific facts on CWD TSE prion disease, then I am guilty.

I do not advertise on the blogs I post the tse prion science too or make money from doing this daily for 15+ years. it's just easier post a simple topic to a link, and then the science that goes with it, and it's much shorter. folks can read it or not. but then you have the ones that complain about just a short link with no discussion. I post a long topic with discussion, then you have the ones that complain about me posting such a long thread. it's like dang if I do, dang if I don't. fact is, nobody wants to discuss cwd and or the shooting pens that are _helping_ to spread it.

I am a meat eater, pro-hunter, I am pro-gun, pro-2nd amendment, was just at the gun range yesterday.

reason i do this, i lost my mother to hvCJD confirmed, and i simply made a promise to her that day back in 1997, i would do everything i could to prevent that from happening again. guess what...i failed.....end of story.....kind regards, terry


Edited by flounder (Today at 02:28 PM)
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#932399 - Today at 02:32 PM Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: Clem]
flounder Offline spike

Registered: 11/01/12
Posts: 16
Loc: Texas
Originally Posted By: Clem
Quote:
i am beginning to think that aldeer.com is bordering censorship?


This site is privately owned. The owners - four of them - can do whatever they want in regard to any person/persona on this board.

The First Amendment guarantees everyone the right to free speech. It does not guarantee anyone prevention, protection from or the absence of repercussion of that speech.





I completely agree, but could you please tell ted nugent that...


Suzanna Gratia Hupp explains meaning of 2nd Amendment!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1u0Byq5Qis




kind regards,
terry

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#932416 - 42 minutes 52 seconds ago Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Frankie Online   content 10 point

Registered: 04/15/00
Posts: 4112
Loc: Clanton , Al
flounder ,,, i find your post through out internet history to lead me to believe you are not pro meat . i read a lot of stuff out there even the stuff you have posted at veggie source and many other places . i feel if any thing you lean towards AR .

IMO !!!!!!

for sure this aint even the 10TH place you've posted this stuff .


Edited by Frankie (40 minutes 54 seconds ago)

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#932417 - 40 minutes 37 seconds ago Re: Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club [Re: flounder]
Skinny Offline GUVNER

Registered: 08/25/01
Posts: 29832
Loc: Luverne, AL
flounder, every admin and mod here gave you a chance but your weird OCD about CWD is really annoying. Hope all the best to you, CYA

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