Sunday, April 06, 2014

The Conservation Federation of Missouri is Opposed to the Transfer of Captive White-tailed Deer Management

CFM News


The Conservation Federation of Missouri is Opposed to the Transfer of Captive White-tailed Deer Management


Saturday, 05 April 2014 14:57 Last Updated on Saturday, 05 April 2014 14:58


Written by Rob Brandenburg


Legislation is currently working its way through the Missouri Senate (SB964) and House of Representatives (HB2031) to change the classification of captive cervids from "wildlife" to "livestock."


The legislation aims to transfer control of captive cervids from the Department of Conservation to the Department of Agriculture. At legislative hearings held for both bills, an official Department of Agriculture representative testified in opposition of the transfer. The Department of Agriculture believes MDC should manage whitetail deer. The Conservation Federation of Missouri agrees.


CFM has assembled a Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) committee to help provide direction on the complex issues surrounding the CWD outbreak in Missouri. The CFM is working with state agencies, legislators, CFM members and the public to educate them on CWD.


According to the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance (a joint collaboration of non-profit wildlife organizations), CWD is a contagious neurological disease affecting deer, elk and moose. It causes a characteristic spongy degeneration of the brains of infected animals resulting in emaciation, abnormal behavior, loss of bodily functions and death.


One aspect of CWD management the CFM supports is increased regulatory oversight of the captive cervid (deer) industry. CFM believes current operation standards pose a significant risk to public wildlife resources. This calls for stricter measures.


CWD remains prevalent in the national press. Just in the last week, the Indianapolis Star released a groundbreaking report on the captive cervid industry and the Boone & Crockett Club issued their position statement.


Ryan Sablow, an investigative journalist with the Indianapolis Star, spent over a year researching captive cervid facilities. His report "Buck Fever" has been picked up by many regional and national news outlets, and was even featured by the USA Today.


Sablow wrote, "To feed the burgeoning captive-deer industry, breeders are shipping an unprecedented number of deer and elk across state lines. With them go the diseases they carry. Captive-deer facilities have spread tuberculosis to cattle and are suspected in the spread of deadly foreign deer lice in the West. More important, The Star's investigation uncovered compelling circumstantial evidence that the industry also has helped accelerate the spread of chronic wasting disease, an always-fatal deer disease similar to mad cow. CWD now has been found in 22 states."


Click on this link to read and watch the entire "Buck Fever" feature:


The Boone & Crockett Club is a national wildlife organization that exists to improve the system of conservation throughout North America. Conservation heroes, President Theodore Roosevelt and George Bird Grinnell, founded it in 1887. In regards to captive deer, the Boone & Crockett Club, states:


"The Boone and Crockett Club supports state bans on importing or exporting captive deer and elk by game farming operations in order to protect the health of native populations. The Club opposes any legislation aimed at relaxing regulations governing captive cervid breeding operations or removing management authority over such operations from state wildlife agencies."



Read the Boone & Crockett Club's full position statement at


The Conservation Federation of Missouri's CWD Committee firmly believes the Missouri Department of Conservation must remain the agency responsible for the regulation of all white-tailed deer in Missouri, both wild and captive. CFM also believes MDC must strengthen regulation of the captive cervid industry.


For more information about captive cervids and CWD in Missouri, visit


Let your voice be heard. Contact your local legislators and tell them how you feel about the transfer of captive cervids from the Missouri Department of Conservation to the Missouri Department of Agriculture.


To find your Senator, visit


To find your Representative, visit





Sunday, January 06, 2013




*** "it‘s no longer its business.” ***



Saturday, June 29, 2013





Friday, April 04, 2014


*** Wisconsin State officials kept silent on CWD discovery at game farm ***



October 11, 2013


Protecting Missouri's White-Tailed Deer fill out the questionnaire ;



Friday, September 20, 2013


Missouri State records show gaps in oversight of captive deer farms, ranches



Sunday, June 09, 2013


Missouri House forms 13-member Interim Committee on the Cause and Spread of Chronic Wasting Disease CWD



Tuesday, May 28, 2013


Chronic Wasting Disease CWD quarantine Louisiana via CWD index herd Pennsylvania Update May 28, 2013


*** 6 doe from Pennsylvania CWD index herd still on the loose in Louisiana, quarantine began on October 18, 2012, still ongoing, Lake Charles premises.



Monday, June 24, 2013


The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery



Tuesday, June 11, 2013


CWD GONE WILD, More cervid escapees from more shooting pens on the loose in Pennsylvania



Wednesday, August 21, 2013






15. On April 26, 2013, the Brakkes hand-delivered a notice to the DNR’s Chief of Law Enforcement Bureau, notifying the DNR that they would no longer operate a hunting preserve on the Quarantined Premises. The Brakkes did not reveal any plans to remove the fence around the Quarantined Premises or to remove the gates to and from the Quarantined Premises in this April 26, 2013 letter.


16. On June 3, 2013, DNR became aware that sections of the exterior fence surrounding the Quarantined Premises had been removed and that some, if not all, of the exterior gates to and from the Quarantined Premises were open.


17. On June 4, 2013, DNR received reports from the public in the area that four wild deer were observed inside the Quarantined Premises.


18. On June 5, 2013, DNR conducted a fence inspection, after gaining approval from surrounding landowners, and confirmed that the fenced had been cut or removed in at least four separate locations; that the fence had degraded and was failing to maintain the enclosure around the Quarantined Premises in at least one area; that at least three gates had been opened; and that deer tracks were visible in and around one of the open areas in the sand on both sides of the fence, evidencing movement of deer into the Quarantined Premises.









Wisconsin : 436 Deer Have Escaped From Farms to Wild


Date: March 18, 2003 Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel




State finds violations, lax record keeping at many sites, report says A state inspection of private deer farms, prompted by the discovery of chronic wasting disease, found that 436 white-tailed deer escaped into the wild, officials said Tuesday


The Department of Natural Resources found that captive deer have escaped from one-third of the state's 550 deer farms over the lifetime of the operations. The agency also uncovered hundreds of violations and has sought a total of 60 citations or charges against deer farm operators.


Hundreds of deer escape


The DNR found a total of 671 deer that escaped farms - 436 of which were never found - because of storm-damaged fences, gates being left open or the animals jumping over or through fences.



Thursday, October 03, 2013


*** TAHC ADOPTS CWD RULE THAT the amendments __REMOVE__ the requirement for a specific fence height for captives ***


Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC)


October 3, 2013




News Release: November 4, 2011


Facebook: WV Commerce - State Parks


Hoy Murphy, Public Information Officer (304) 957-9365 Contact: Curtis Taylor, Wildlife Resources Section Chief 304-558-2771


Elk escape from captive cervid facility in Pennsylvania near West Virginia border


SOUTH CHARLESTON, W.Va. – The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources (WVDNR) has confirmed with officials from the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture (PDA) that at least two elk, including one adult bull and one cow, have escaped from a captive cervid facility (deer and elk farms) in Greene County, Pa. Greene County shares a common border with Marshall, Wetzel and Monongalia counties in West Virginia. The elk escaped from a captive cervid facility located approximately three miles from the West Virginia-Pennsylvania border.


The PDA regulates captive cervid facilities in Pennsylvania. A representative of the agency was unaware if the recent escaped elk were tagged. The WVDNR regulates captive cervid facilities in West Virginia. In West Virginia, all captive cervids in breeding facilities must be ear-tagged, and there are currently no reported elk escapes from any facility in West Virginia.


A bull elk has been seen recently in Wetzel County, W.Va., according to WVDNR officials. There have been no reports of cow elk sightings in either Wetzel County, W.Va., or Greene County, Pa. No free-ranging wild elk live within 150 miles of Wetzel County. The elk sighted in Wetzel County is likely the escaped animal from the captive facility in Pennsylvania.



Monday, June 11, 2012


*** OHIO Captive deer escapees and non-reporting ***



Friday, September 28, 2012


Stray elk renews concerns about deer farm security Minnesota



Wednesday, January 02, 2013


Iowa Third Deer Positive CWD at Davis County Hunting Preserve Captive Shooting Pen



Tuesday, March 26, 2013


CWD Missouri remains confined to Linn-Macon-County Core Area with four new cases



Tuesday, November 13, 2012





Wednesday, January 16, 2013


Illinois DuPage county deer found with Chronic Wasting Disease CWD



Wednesday, September 04, 2013


*** cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild ***



Between 1996 and 2002, chronic wasting disease was diagnosed in 39 herds of farmed elk in Saskatchewan in a single epidemic. All of these herds were depopulated as part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) disease eradication program. Animals, primarily over 12 mo of age, were tested for the presence CWD prions following euthanasia. Twenty-one of the herds were linked through movements of live animals with latent CWD from a single infected source herd in Saskatchewan, 17 through movements of animals from 7 of the secondarily infected herds.


***The source herd is believed to have become infected via importation of animals from a game farm in South Dakota where CWD was subsequently diagnosed (7,4). A wide range in herd prevalence of CWD at the time of herd depopulation of these herds was observed. Within-herd transmission was observed on some farms, while the disease remained confined to the introduced animals on other farms.



Friday, May 13, 2011


Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) outbreaks and surveillance program in the Republic of Korea Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) outbreaks and surveillance program in the Republic of Korea


Hyun-Joo Sohn, Yoon-Hee Lee, Min-jeong Kim, Eun-Im Yun, Hyo-Jin Kim, Won-Yong Lee, Dong-Seob Tark, In- Soo Cho, Foreign Animal Disease Research Division, National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service, Republic of Korea


Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been recognized as an important prion disease in native North America deer and Rocky mountain elks. The disease is a unique member of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), which naturally affects only a few species. CWD had been limited to USA and Canada until 2000. On 28 December 2000, information from the Canadian government showed that a total of 95 elk had been exported from farms with CWD to Korea. These consisted of 23 elk in 1994 originating from the so-called “source farm” in Canada, and 72 elk in 1997, which had been held in pre export quarantine at the “source farm”.Based on export information of CWD suspected elk from Canada to Korea, CWD surveillance program was initiated by the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) in 2001. All elks imported in 1997 were traced back, however elks imported in 1994 were impossible to identify. CWD control measures included stamping out of all animals in the affected farm, and thorough cleaning and disinfection of the premises. In addition, nationwide clinical surveillance of Korean native cervids, and improved measures to ensure reporting of CWD suspect cases were implemented. Total of 9 elks were found to be affected. CWD was designated as a notifiable disease under the Act for Prevention of Livestock Epidemics in 2002. Additional CWD cases - 12 elks and 2 elks - were diagnosed in 2004 and 2005. Since February of 2005, when slaughtered elks were found to be positive, all slaughtered cervid for human consumption at abattoirs were designated as target of the CWD surveillance program. Currently, CWD laboratory testing is only conducted by National Reference Laboratory on CWD, which is the Foreign Animal Disease Division (FADD) of National Veterinary Research and Quarantine Service (NVRQS). In July 2010, one out of 3 elks from Farm 1 which were slaughtered for the human consumption was confirmed as positive. Consequently, all cervid – 54 elks, 41 Sika deer and 5 Albino deer – were culled and one elk was found to be positive. Epidemiological investigations were conducted by Veterinary Epidemiology Division (VED) of NVRQS in collaboration with provincial veterinary services. Epidemiologically related farms were found as 3 farms and all cervid at these farms were culled and subjected to CWD diagnosis. Three elks and 5 crossbreeds (Red deer and Sika deer) were confirmed as positive at farm 2. All cervids at Farm 3 and Farm 4 – 15 elks and 47 elks – were culled and confirmed as negative. Further epidemiological investigations showed that these CWD outbreaks were linked to the importation of elks from Canada in 1994 based on circumstantial evidences. In December 2010, one elk was confirmed as positive at Farm 5. Consequently, all cervid – 3 elks, 11 Manchurian Sika deer and 20 Sika deer – were culled and one Manchurian Sika deer and seven Sika deer were found to be positive. This is the first report of CWD in these sub-species of deer. Epidemiological investigations found that the owner of the Farm 2 in CWD outbreaks in July 2010 had co-owned the Farm 5. In addition, it was newly revealed that one positive elk was introduced from Farm 6 of Jinju-si Gyeongsang Namdo. All cervid – 19 elks, 15 crossbreed (species unknown) and 64 Sika deer – of Farm 6 were culled, but all confirmed as negative. : Corresponding author: Dr. Hyun-Joo Sohn (+82-31-467-1867, E-mail:


2011 Pre-congress Workshop: TSEs in animals and their environment 5





Friday, May 13, 2011


Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) outbreaks and surveillance program in the Republic of Korea



Monday, June 18, 2012


natural cases of CWD in eight Sika deer (Cervus nippon) and five Sika/red deer crossbreeds captive Korea and Experimental oral transmission to red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus)



Tuesday, June 05, 2012


Captive Deer Breeding Legislation Overwhelmingly Defeated During 2012 Legislative Session



Thursday, July 11, 2013


The New Hornographers: The Fight Over the Future of Texas Deer, Captive shooting pens, and the CWD TSE prion disease



Tuesday, July 02, 2013


National Rifle Association and the Unified Sportsman of Florida support a Florida ban on the importation of captive deer and cervids into Florida



Monday, October 07, 2013


The importance of localized culling in stabilizing chronic wasting disease prevalence in white-tailed deer populations



Friday, March 07, 2014


37th Annual Southeast Deer Study Group Meeting in Athens, Georgia (CWD TSE Prion abstracts)



Saturday, March 15, 2014


Potential role of soil properties in the spread of CWD in western Canada



Monday, March 03, 2014


*** APHIS to Offer Indemnity for CWD Positive Herds as Part of Its Cervid Health Activities ???



Saturday, February 04, 2012


*** Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised



Sunday, September 01, 2013


*** hunting over gut piles and CWD TSE prion disease



Saturday, March 29, 2014


*** Game Farm, CWD Concerns Rise at Boone and Crockett Club ***



Therefore, it is considered that farmed and park deer may have a higher probability of exposure to CWD transferred to the environment than wild deer given the restricted habitat range and higher frequency of contact with tourists and returning GB residents.





Singeltary submission ;


Program Standards: Chronic Wasting Disease Herd Certification Program and Interstate Movement of Farmed or Captive Deer, Elk, and Moose


*** DOCUMENT ID: APHIS-2006-0118-0411



examples as follows ;




There are now at least 5 known captive research facilities and at least 3 zoos and 5 game farms involved in CWD, all traceable if you want to shipments of animals out of Ft. Collins. These are:


1. Sybille Wildlife Research and Education Center, Visitor Center and Wildlife Viewing Sites - on Hwy. 34, about 28 miles SW from I25 exit south of Wheatland State of Wyoming - Game and Fish Department - Sybille Visitor Center 2362 Highway 34 Wheatland State WY 82201 Phone 307-322-2784 from 4


2. Kremmling. Colorado State University - Cooperative Extension - Grand County PO. Box 475 Kremmling State CO 80459 Phone 303-724-3436 from 1


3. Meeker. Colorado State University - Cooperative Extension - Rio Blanco County 779 Sulphur Creek Road, Box 270 City Meeker CO 81641 Phone 303-878-4093 from 1


4. Main Ft. Collins facility. State of Colorado - Division of Wildlife - Wildlife Research Center State of Colorado - Division of Wildlife - Wildlife Research Center 317 West Prospect City Fort Collins CO 80526 Phone 970-484-2836


5. Wild Animal Disease Center, CSU, Ft. Collins exchanging cervids with 4


6. Denver zoo receiving mule deer from 4


7. Toronto zoo receiving mule deer from 4


8. Wyoming zoo receiving mule deer from 1


9. South Dakota game farm receiving calf elk from 1 or 4 [?]


10. Regina, Saskatchewan game farm receiving South Dakota elk, 27 April, 1996 confirmation. from 9


11. 12 cases of CWD reported now from S. Dakota, at least 2 different herds, seemingly 3-4 game farms, from 1 and 4.










Inactivation of the TSE Prion disease


Chronic Wasting Disease CWD, and other TSE prion disease, these TSE prions know no borders.


these TSE prions know no age restrictions.


The TSE prion disease survives ashing to 600 degrees celsius, that’s around 1112 degrees farenheit.


you cannot cook the TSE prion disease out of meat.


you can take the ash and mix it with saline and inject that ash into a mouse, and the mouse will go down with TSE.


Prion Infected Meat-and-Bone Meal Is Still Infectious after Biodiesel Production as well.


the TSE prion agent also survives Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes.


IN fact, you should also know that the TSE Prion agent will survive in the environment for years, if not decades.


you can bury it and it will not go away.


The TSE agent is capable of infected your water table i.e. Detection of protease-resistant cervid prion protein in water from a CWD-endemic area.


it’s not your ordinary pathogen you can just cook it out and be done with. that’s what’s so worrisome about Iatrogenic mode of transmission, a simple autoclave will not kill this TSE prion agent.


Sunday, March 30, 2014


*** Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates ***



*** our results raise the possibility that CJD cases classified as VV1 may include cases caused by iatrogenic transmission of sCJD-MM1 prions or food-borne infection by type 1 prions from animals, e.g., chronic wasting disease prions in cervid. In fact, two CJD-VV1 patients who hunted deer or consumed venison have been reported (40, 41). The results of the present study emphasize the need for traceback studies and careful re-examination of the biochemical properties of sCJD-VV1 prions. ***



Thursday, January 2, 2014


*** CWD TSE Prion in cervids to hTGmice, Heidenhain Variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease MM1 genotype, and iatrogenic CJD ??? ***




Sunday, March 30, 2014


*** Chronic Wasting Disease Agents in Nonhuman Primates ***






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