Friday, May 30, 2014

Wisconsin Waushara County hunting preserve ordered to pay civil forfeiture in CWD case

Waushara County hunting preserve ordered to pay civil forfeiture in CWD case


Release Date: May 30, 2014


Contact: Raechelle Cline, 608-224-5005 Jim Dick, Communications Director, 608-224-5020


MADISON -- A Waushara County hunting preserve agreed to a civil forfeiture for failing to test hunter-killed deer for chronic wasting disease (CWD). The non-compliance was first identified in 2010, the State Veterinarian’s office said today.


In a plea agreement with Waushara County, Kevin Schmid, owner of Little Texas, LLC, accepted a plea of no contest for failing to test the appropriate number of animals for CWD as set forth in ATCP 10.52(1m). Schmid has been ordered to pay Waushara County Circuit Court $5,000 plus court costs and fees.


“CWD surveillance is a priority for this department so the rules exist for a good reason,” said State Veterinarian Dr. Paul McGraw. “Testing is required so that we can detect CWD early enough to protect both the farm raised deer and wild deer.”


At the time the offense took place, Wisconsin required 100 percent of farm-raised deer 16 months of age or older to be tested for CWD that are killed or die naturally on the premises. During a routine inspection, it was determined that Schmid had not been testing all hunter killed deer, tests that should have been completed. Since this failure to test was identified, this farm has come into compliance with testing requirements.


“Our animal health laws are in place to protect animal health and the industry,” McGraw said. “In general, we have had great compliance with these laws from the farm raised deer industry, which ensures the risk of CWD on farms is very low. When a farm fails to follow the law, we take it seriously.”


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how many states have $465,000., and can quarantine and purchase there from, each cwd said infected farm, but how many states can afford this for all the cwd infected cervid game ranch type farms, and this is just one cwd infected farm, which had the highest documented infection rate of cwd, documented at 80%.


Tuesday, December 20, 2011




The CWD infection rate was nearly 80%, the highest ever in a North American captive herd. RECOMMENDATION: That the Board approve the purchase of 80 acres of land for $465,000 for the Statewide Wildlife Habitat Program in Portage County and approve the restrictions on public use of the site.





Friday, April 04, 2014


Wisconsin State officials kept silent on CWD discovery at game farm



Tuesday, March 25, 2014


Transmission of Chronic Wasting Disease in Wisconsin White-Tailed Deer: Implications for Disease Spread and Management


*** However, we also note that CWD transmission rates and prevalence are much higher in captive deer farms than has been reported in wild populations [67].



Tuesday, February 11, 2014


*** Wisconsin tracks 81 deer from game farm with CWD buck to seven other states



Monday, December 02, 2013





Tuesday, December 17, 2013


Wisconsin Second CWD positive deer found in Grant County



Friday, February 03, 2012


Wisconsin Farm-Raised Deer Farms and CWD there from 2012 report Singeltary et al





There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. ...




C. & D. Captive Cervid and Law Enforcement Update (11:10 AM)- Warden Pete Dunn gave the captive cervid farm update.


There were 26 reported escape incidents so far this year, this amounted to 20 actual confirmed escape incidents because 3 were previously reported, 2 were confirmed as wild deer, and 1 incident was not confirmed. Approximately 30% of these escapes were caused by gates being left open and the other 70% resulted from bad fencing or fence related issues. The 20 actual confirmed escape incidents amounted to 77 total animals. 50 of the escaped animals were recovered or killed and 27 were not recovered and remain unaccounted for. Last year the CWD Committee passed a resolution to require double gates, but this has not gone into effect yet. Questions were raised by the committee about double fencing requirements? Pete responded that double fencing has not been practical or accepted by the industry. The DNR has the authority to do fence inspections. ? If a fence fails to pass the inspection the fencing certificate can be revoked and the farmer can be issued a citation. This year three citations and one warning have been issued for escapes. Pete reviewed the reporting requirements for escape incidents that these must be reported within 24 hours. The farmer then has 72 hours to recover the animals or else it will affect the farm’s herd status and ability to move animals. Davin proposed in the 15 year CWD Plan that the DNR take total control and regulatory authority over all deer farm fencing. Larry Gohlke asked Pete about the reliability for reporting escapes? Pete said that the majority of escapes were reported by the farmer, but it is very difficult to determine when an escape actually occurred. Pete said that they are more concerned that an escape is reported and not that it is reported at the exact time that it happened.



Wisconsin : 436 Deer Have Escaped From Farms to Wild


Date: March 18, 2003 Source: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel




State finds violations, lax record keeping at many sites, report says


A state inspection of private deer farms, prompted by the discovery of chronic wasting disease, found that 436 white-tailed deer escaped into the wild, officials said Tuesday


The Department of Natural Resources found that captive deer have escaped from one-third of the state's 550 deer farms over the lifetime of the operations. The agency also uncovered hundreds of violations and has sought a total of 60 citations or charges against deer farm operators.




CWD found on 2 farms


Seven deer have tested positive for the disease on game farms - one on a Portage County farm and six on a Walworth County farm - since the disease was discovered in three wild deer killed near Mount Horeb in western Dane County. One deer that tested positive on the Walworth County farm escaped and roamed free for six months.




The audit found that most farms were in compliance, but the DNR found many violations and instances of poor record keeping. Also in numerous instances, fences did not stop wild and captive deer from intermingling.


At least 227 farms conducted part of their business on a cash basis, making it hard to track animal movement with financial records.


For example, both the Internal Revenue Service and the state Department of Revenue have been contacted about a deer farm near Wild Rose in Waushara County that is suspected of selling six large bucks for $45,000 in cash and not using live deer shipping tags as required.


The DNR found that game farm operators have more deer in captivity than their records show, which is "due in part because the owners of a number of large deer farm operations were! unable to accurately count the number of deer within their fences," the audit found.


Hundreds of deer escape


The DNR found a total of 671 deer that escaped farms - 436 of which were never found - because of storm-damaged fences, gates being left open or the animals jumping over or through fences.


In one example in Kewaunee County, a deer farmer's fence was knocked down in a summer storm. Ten deer escaped, and the farmer told the DNR he had no intention of trying to reclaim them. The DNR found five of the deer, killed them and cited the farmer for violation of a regulation related to fencing.


Another deer farmer near Mishicot, in Manitowoc County, released all nine of his whitetails last summer after he believed the discovery of chronic wasting disease was going to drive down the market for captive deer.


The DNR found 24 instances of unlicensed deer farms and issued 19 citations.


Journal Sentinel correspondent Kevin Murphy contributed to this report.


Game Farms Inspected


A summary of the findings of the Department of Natural Resources' inspection of 550 private white-tailed deer farms in the state: The deer farms contained at least 16,070 deer, but the DNR believes there are more deer in captivity than that because large deer farms are unable to accurately count their deer. 671 deer had escaped from game farms, including 436 that were never found.


24 farmers were unlicensed. One had been operating illegally since 1999 after he was denied a license because his deer fence did not meet minimum specifications.


Records maintained by operators ranged from "meticulous documentation to relying on memory." At least 227 farms conducted various portions of their deer farm business with cash. Over the last three years, 1,222 deer died on farms for various reasons. Disease testing was not performed nor required on the majority of deer. Farmers reported doing business with people in 22 other states and one Canadian province. Click these links for more information



The initial discovery at Wilderness Whitetails was the first in five years. In trying to explain the sudden appearance, McGraw cited several possibilities for transmission, including the chance it occurred spontaneously.


That drew attention of Clausen and wildlife staff at the DNR. Clausen said he knew of no peer-reviewed research showing the disease turned up that way.


Tami Ryan, wildlife health section chief with the DNR, asked the agriculture department to back up the claim.


Richard Bourie, a veterinarian, pointed to a paper by Nobel Laureate Stanley Prusiner of the University of California, San Francisco, who discussed spontaneous occurrence in TSEs.


*** Ryan wrote back and said, "to the best of our collective knowledge, spontaneous CWD in wild deer has not been substantiated," although she said the DNR wasn't trying to pick a fight.


Said McGraw: "There is no battle going on here. We all read science here. Everybody looks at different possibilities."



Saturday, February 04, 2012


*** Wisconsin 16 age limit on testing dead deer Game Farm CWD Testing Protocol Needs To Be Revised


Approximately 4,200 fawns, defined as deer under 1 year of age, were sampled from the eradication zone over the last year. The majority of fawns sampled were between the ages of 5 to 9 months, though some were as young as 1 month.


*** Two of the six fawns with CWD detected were 5 to 6 months old.


All six of the positive fawns were taken from the core area of the CWD eradication zone where the highest numbers of positive deer have been identified.



Wednesday, September 04, 2013


***cwd - cervid captive livestock escapes, loose and on the run in the wild...



”The occurrence of CWD must be viewed against the contest of the locations in which it occurred. It was an incidental and unwelcome complication of the respective wildlife research programmes. Despite it’s subsequent recognition as a new disease of cervids, therefore justifying direct investigation, no specific research funding was forthcoming. The USDA veiwed it as a wildlife problem and consequently not their province!” 26.



Sunday, January 06, 2013




*** "it‘s no longer its business.”



Monday, June 24, 2013


The Effects of Chronic Wasting Disease on the Pennsylvania Cervid Industry Following its Discovery



Tuesday, May 20, 2014


“Atypical” Chronic Wasting Disease in PRNP Genotype 225FF Mule Deer



Sunday, May 18, 2014


Chronic Wasting Disease CWD TSE PRION DISEASE and the transmission to other species



Tuesday, May 27, 2014


New Missouri CWD regulations... You know where we stand... What are your thoughts?




kind regards, terry


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